Detoxify

Benefits of Juicing

Juicing Benefits…

Fruits and vegetables are excellent sources of a wide range of vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and other nutrients, including, phytochemicals – compounds that have been shown to combat cancer.

Since more of the healthful substances found in fruits and vegetables are being discovered all the time, no supplement pill can contain all of theses compounds. Also, because each plant appears to produce particular phytochemicals that work against cancer in particular ways, it is suggested that a rich assortment of fruits and vegetables be included in your diet.

It is also recommended that you consume two glasses of live juices a day for health maintenance. Four glasses a day is recommended if you want to speed healing and recovery from illness.

Juicing is an excellent means of adding fruits and vegetables to your diet. Since juice contains the whole fruit or vegetable, except for the fiber, which is the indigestible part of the plant – it contains virtually all of the plants’ health-promoting components.

Because fresh juices are made from raw fruits and vegetables, all of the components remain intact. Vitamin C and other water-soluble vitamins can be damaged by overprocessing or overcooking.

Enzymes, which are proteins needed for digestion and other important functions, can also be damaged by cooking.

Fresh juice, however, provides all of the plants’ healthful ingredients in a form that is easy to digest and absorb. In fact, it has been estimated that fruit and vegetable juices can be assimilated in twenty to thirty minutes.

Ideally, juicing should be made fresh in your kitchen and consumed immediately. Many commercial juices are heat-treated to lengthen shelf life. As previously discussed, this process can destroy important nutrients. In addition, preservatives may have been added. Even pure, freshly made juices can lose some of their nutrients by being allowed to sit for long periods of time. By buying the best products available, properly preparing it for juicing, and processing it in your own juicer, you will produce the most healthful, nutrients-rich drinks possible.

Green Juices or “Green Drinks”

Benefits of Juicing

Green juices cleanse the body of pollutants and have a rejuvenating effect. Made from a variety of green vegetables, green juices are rich in chlorophyll, which helps to purify the blood, build red blood cells, detoxify and heal the body, and provide the body with fast energy.

Green juices can be made with alfalfa sprouts, barley grass, cabbage, kale, dandelion greens, spinach, and other green vegetables, including wheatgrass. Wheatgrass juice is particularly important in any cancer treatment, especially when radiation therapy is involved. To sweeten and dilute your green juices, try adding fresh carrot and apple juice. (No other fruit juice should be added.) Steam distilled water is another good addition.

Although green juices have great health benefits, they should be consumed in moderation. Try drinking about 8 to 10 ounces a day.

You owe yourself a healthier life

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Posted by Fay B. Castro - February 18, 2015 at 9:52 am

Categories: Detoxify, Green Education, Green Life, Green Solutions, Health and Wellness, Living Green   Tags:

Toxic Free Living

Toxins are poisonous substances harmful to the body

Home toxins can be divided into three categories:

  • Airborne
  • Biological
  • Chemical

Airborne – Consist of small air borne particles such as lint, dust mites, human skin, and pet dander.

These toxins are more dangerous than they sound because their small size enables them to travel deep into the lungs.

Biological – Such as bacteria and viruses, attach themselves to airborne particles, increasing the likelihood of lung infections. Mold is also part of this category.

Chemicals – Come into our home in the products that we buy to improve the look, smell, and cleanliness of both ourselves and our home.  There are over 80,000 Chemicals out there used to make cleaning and personal products.  Many have never been tested for toxicity by themselves let alone in combination.  Every year 1,800 are introduced in North America, with little to no toxicity test.

 

 

 

GermGuardian AC4825, 3-in-1 Air Cleaning System with True HEPA, UV-C and Odor Reduction, 22-Inch

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Posted by Fay B. Castro - February 11, 2015 at 11:50 am

Categories: Chemicals, Detoxify, Green Solutions, Health and Wellness, Living Green   Tags:

Acrylamide in Food

Acrylamide Toxicity

  • Acrylamide has been found in certain foods, with especially high levels in potato chips, French fries, and other food products produced by high-temperature cooking
  • Food and cigarette smoke are the major sources of exposure to acrylamide
  • Acrylamide is considered to be a mutagen and a probable human carcinogen, based mainly on studies in laboratory animals

Scientists do not yet know with any certainty whether the levels of acrylamide typically found in some foods pose a health risk for humans.

  • What is acrylamide? Acrylamide is a chemical used primarily as a building block in making polyacrylamide and acrylamide copolymers. Polyacrylamide and acrylamide copolymers are used in many industrial processes, such as the production of paper, dyes, and plastics, and in the treatment of drinking water and wastewater, including sewage. They are also found in consumer products, such as caulking, food packaging, and some adhesives. Trace amounts of acrylamide generally remain in these products.

  • Is there acrylamide in food? Researchers in Europe and the United States have found acrylamide in certain foods that were heated to a temperature above 120 degrees Celsius (248 degrees Fahrenheit), but not in foods prepared below this temperature. Potato chips and French fries were found to contain higher levels of acrylamide compared with other foods. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) stated that the levels of acrylamide in foods pose a “major concern” and that more research is needed to determine the risk of dietary acrylamide exposure.
  • How does cooking produce acrylamide? Asparagine is an amino acid (a building block of proteins) that is found in many vegetables, with higher concentrations in some varieties of potatoes. When heated to high temperatures in the presence of certain sugars, asparagine can form acrylamide. High-temperature cooking methods, such as frying, baking, or broiling, have been found to produce acrylamide, while boiling and microwaving appear less likely to do so. Longer cooking times can also increase acrylamide production when the cooking temperature is above 120 degrees Celsius.
  • Is there anything in the cooking process that can be changed to lower dietary acrylamide exposure? Decreasing cooking time, blanching potatoes before frying, and postdrying (drying in a hot air oven after frying) have been shown to decrease the acrylamide content of some foods.
  • Should I change my dietAcrylamide levels in food vary widely depending on the manufacturer, the cooking time, and the method and temperature of the cooking process. The best advice at this time is to follow established dietary guidelines and eat a healthy, balanced diet that is low in fat and rich in high-fiber grains, fruits, and vegetables.
  • Are there other ways humans are exposed to acrylamide? Food and cigarette smoke are the major sources of acrylamide exposure. Exposure to acrylamide from other sources is likely to be significantly less than that from food or smoking, but scientists do not yet have a complete understanding of all sources of exposure. Acrylamide and polyacrylamide are used in some industrial and agricultural procedures, and regulations are in place to limit exposure in those settings.

  • Does acrylamide increase the risk of cancerStudies in rodent models have found that acrylamide exposure poses a risk for several types of cancer. However, the evidence from human studies is still incomplete. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer consider acrylamide to be a “probable human carcinogen,” based on studies in laboratory animals given acrylamide in drinking water. However, toxicology studies have shown differences in acrylamide absorption rates between humans and rodents.

A series of case-control studies have investigated the relationship between dietary intake of acrylamide and the risk of developing cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, larynx, large bowel, kidney, breast, and ovary. These studies generally found no excess of tumors associated with acrylamide intake. In the studies, however, not all acrylamide-containing foods were included in estimating exposures. In addition, information in case-control studies about exposures is often based on interviews (personal or through questionnaires) with the case and control subjects, and these groups may differ in the accuracy of their recall about exposures. One factor that might influence recall accuracy in cancer-related dietary studies is that diets are often altered after receiving a diagnosis of cancer.

To avoid such limitations in accurately determining acrylamide exposure, biomarkers of exposure were recently used in a Danish cohort study designed to evaluate the subsequent risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Among women with higher levels of acrylamide bound to the hemoglobin in their blood, there was a statistically significant increase in risk of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. This finding suggests an endocrine hormone-related effect, which would be consistent with the results of a questionnaire-based cohort study in the Netherlands that found an excess of endometrial and ovarian cancer—but not of postmenopausal breast cancer—associated with higher levels of acrylamide exposure. Another cohort study from the Netherlands suggested a positive association between dietary acrylamide and the risk of renal cell cancer, but not of prostate or bladder cancer.

What are other health effects of acrylamide? High levels of acrylamide in the workplace have been shown to cause neurological damage, e.g., among workers using acrylamide polymers to clarify water in coal preparation plants.

Are acrylamide levels regulated? The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates acrylamide in drinking water. The EPA established an acceptable level of acrylamide exposure, set low enough to account for any uncertainty in the data relating acrylamide to cancer and neurotoxic effects. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates the amount of residual acrylamide in a variety of materials that come in contact with food, but there are currently no guidelines governing the presence of acrylamide in food itself.

What research is needed? Although studies in rodent models suggest that acrylamide is a potential carcinogen, additional epidemiological cohort studies are needed to help determine any effects of dietary acrylamide intake on human cancer risk. It is also important to determine how acrylamide is formed during the cooking process and whether acrylamide is present in foods other than those already tested. This information will enable more accurate and comprehensive estimates of dietary exposure. Biospecimencollections in cohort studies will provide an opportunity to avoid the limitations of interview-based dietary assessments by examining biomarkers of exposure to acrylamide and its metabolites in relation to the subsequent risk of cancer.

For information about acrylamide in food from the WHO and FAO, please visit the WHO Web site at http://www.who.int/search/semantic/en/#search=acrylamide%20in%20food&sort=score%20desc&fq=%7B!noshow%3Dtrue%7Dlanguages%3Aenon the Internet.

 

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Posted by Fay B. Castro - January 23, 2012 at 6:04 pm

Categories: Chemicals, Detoxify, Health and Wellness   Tags:

Detoxify your Body

Why are we so unhealthy?

Detoxify Your Body

When people talk about detoxification and cleansing the body of harmful toxins, it’s often seen as a fringe element of vegetarians. People really don’t like to think about harmful toxins building up in their colons or in their arteries, but it’s often a by-product of a carnivorous diet. A diet that’s high in fat and processed foods tends to slow down our digestive systems, and our elimination processes are also interrupted.

This can allow harmful bacteria and toxins to accumulate and can create a general feeling of sluggishness, as well as a host of digestive disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome or colitis. When we begin eating a more healthy vegetarian diet, we start to get more dietary fiber into our systems, and all of a sudden, our digestive systems start to work better,

When you eliminate high-fat meat and processed foods from your diet, then much of your body’s energy is freed from the intense work of digesting these foods. Everything becomes clearer – your blood, your organs, your mind. You start to become more aware of the toxic nature of the food you’d been eating before.

Toxicity is of much greater concern in the twentieth century than ever before. There are many new and stronger chemicals, air and water pollution, radiation and nuclear power. We ingest new chemicals, use more drugs of all kinds, eat more sugar and refined foods, and daily abuse ourselves with various stimulants and sedatives. The incidence of many toxicity diseases has increased as well. Cancer and cardiovascular disease are two of the main ones. Arthritis, allergies, obesity, and many skin problems are others. In addition, a wide range of symptoms, such as headaches, fatigue, pains, coughs, gastrointestinal problems, and problems from immune weakness, can all be related to toxicity. When you start a vegetarian eating plan, your body eventually cleanses itself of the harmful effects of these toxic foods.

The best way to avoid Acrylamide found in certain foods is to boil or steam your food or eat your vegetables raw.

Even if you work out and eat healthy you can still become polluted. The air that you breathe, the food that you eat, perfumes, deodorants and lotions. The list goes on and on. All of these things introduce chemicals into your body and over time these chemicals build up and cause you to be overweight and unhealthy.

As time goes on toxic build up thickens and becomes increasingly difficult for your body to absorb the nutrients it needs due to the thick layer of fecal matter separating it from nutrients. Toxins are also absorbed into the skin, our organs, our brain and even our cells. These toxins are normally moved by the body through proper nutrition and healthy exercise, not so anymore.

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Posted by Fay B. Castro - December 28, 2011 at 8:42 pm

Categories: Chemicals, Detoxify, Green Life, Health and Wellness, Non Toxic Products   Tags: